London

Your Guide To Autumn 2017 In South London

Your Guide To Autumn 2017 In South London

As September approaches, it is time to accept that Autumn is upon us. As it gets a little colder and darker, it's easy to retreat into your living room for 6 months. But Autumn 2017 South of the river is looking to be packed with stuff to do, and we wouldn't want you to miss it. Whether you're into art, music, cooking or socialising, we've got you covered. So throw on your scarves and rally up some friends, because Autumn is the new Summer in South London. 

Behind The Names: London Borough of Southwark

Behind The Names: London Borough of Southwark

In the third installment of our series explaining the origins of the names of the areas of South London we will be focusing on the great London Borough of Southwark. Along with Lambeth, Lewisham and Greenwich it forms part of what we like to call the 'four shark teeth' of South London. We might have included Wandsworth in that list because it does look a little - actually a lot - like tiger shark tooth. Go on, search the boundaries of Wandsworth and then compare it against a tiger shark tooth. You'll see, you will all see. Anyway, less about fearsome fish and more about the reason behind the names of areas. Southwark is probably the installment we've looking forward to most because of some of the really curious names in the borough, like Denmark Hill or Elephant and Castle - frankly, we really cannot wait to explain it.

A Brief History of Southwark Cathedral

A Brief History of Southwark Cathedral

It might surprise you that Southwark actually has two cathedrals, one Anglican and one Catholic - the other is St. George's Cathedral. It's relatively remarkable that there is only one other Anglican cathedral (St Paul's) and one other Catholic cathedral (Westminster) in the rest of London. Southwark has two cathedrals alone, and it's just a part of London - there are only six other cities in England and Wales where this is also the case: Birmingham, Liverpool, Newcastle, Norwich, Portsmouth, and Sheffield. In this instance we're going to be talking about the Anglican Southwark Cathedral

A Brief History Of The Woolwich Ferry

A Brief History Of The Woolwich Ferry

For those who don't know, the Woolwich Ferry is a free ferry service that connects Woolwich on the south side of the Thames, with North Woolwich on the north side. Like doing a history of the Greenwich and Woolwich Foot Tunnels, some might argue that the Woolwich Ferry really exists across the Thames, however, like the Woolwich Foot Tunnel, it's named after Woolwich, which is in South London. No North London, you can't have the Woolwich Ferry - you already took Woolwich Arsenal (when was there ever an actual arsenal in Holloway Road we ask?). This is all very brash fighting talk and, as you'll see, we're going to have to backtrack pretty hard on it after this first glorious image of the Woolwich Ferry, but for the time being, we'll maintain our stance as we begin a brief history of the Woolwich Ferry.

London History Day

London History Day

On Wednesday 31st May 2017 the first ever London History Day is set to he held. The date marks the anniversary of the day in 1859 when Big Ben began keeping time for the residents of London. The aim of the day is to highlight our great city’s wonderful history and is part of Historic England’s wider ‘Keep it London’ campaign, which aims to make Londoners discuss and celebrate the heritage of the capital. All across London, more than 40 galleries, museums and institution will be showing rare London-related objects, or staging special events and conducting tours to mark the occasion. A number of these special events will be happening south of the river in the more pleasant half of London. To save you time, we at South London Club have compiled a list of the events happening in South London